March 2

How to Implement Pagination rel=next & rel=prev for News Sites

 

google-pagination-rel-next-rel-prev

Here are tips from official Google Guidelines that help to implement “Pagination” attributes to solve duplicate content for websites especially news website

 

Implementing rel=”next” and rel=”prev”

If you prefer option 3 (above) for your site, let’s get started! Let’s say you have content paginated into the URLs:

http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=1
http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=2
http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=3
http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=4

On the first page, http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=1, you’d include in the<head> section:
<link rel="next" href="http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=2" />

On the second page, http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=2:
<link rel="prev" href="http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=1" />
<link rel="next" href="http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=3" />

On the third page, http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=3:
<link rel="prev" href="http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=2" />
<link rel="next" href="http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=4" />

And on the last page, http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=4:
<link rel="prev" href="http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=3" />

A few points to mention:

  • The first page only contains rel=”next” and no rel=”prev” markup.
  • Pages two to the second-to-last page should be doubly-linked with both rel=”next” and rel=”prev” markup.
  • The last page only contains markup for rel=”prev”, not rel=”next”.
  • rel=”next” and rel=”prev” values can be either relative or absolute URLs (as allowed by the<link> tag). And, if you include a <base> link in your document, relative paths will resolve according to the base URL.
  • rel=”next” and rel=”prev” only need to be declared within the <head> section, not within the document <body>.
  • We allow rel=”previous” as a syntactic variant of rel=”prev” links.
  • rel=”next” and rel=”previous” on the one hand and rel=”canonical” on the other constitute independent concepts. Both declarations can be included in the same page. For example, http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=2&sessionid=123 may contain:<link rel="canonical" href="http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=2”/>
    <link rel="prev" href="http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=1&sessionid=123" />
    <link rel="next" href="http://www.example.com/article?story=abc&page=3&sessionid=123" />
  • rel=”prev” and rel=”next” act as hints to Google, not absolute directives.
  • When implemented incorrectly, such as omitting an expected rel=”prev” or rel=”next” designation in the series, we’ll continue to index the page(s), and rely on our own heuristics to understand your content.

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